Early-life exposure to Perfluoroalkyl substances and childhood metabolic function

Background: Perfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) are synthetic chemicals that may persist in the environment and in humans. There is a possible association between early-life PFAS exposure and metabolic dysfunction in later life, but data are limited. Methods: We studied 665 mother–child pairs in Project Viva, a Boston, Massachusetts-area cohort recruited 1999–2002. We quantified concentrations of PFASs [perfluorooctanoate (PFOA), perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS), perfluorononanoate (PFNA), perfluorohexane sulfonate (PFHxS), and perfluorodecanoate (PFDeA)] in maternal plasma collected at the first prenatal visit (median, 9.6 weeks gestation) and in child plasma from the mid-childhood research visit (median, 7.7 years). We assessed leptin, adiponectin, and homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) in mid-childhood. We fit covariate-adjusted linear regression models and conducted stratified analyses by child sex. Results: Children with higher PFAS concentrations had lower HOMA-IR [e.g., –10.1% (95% CI: –17.3, –2.3) per interquartile range increment in PFOA]. This inverse association between child PFAS and HOMA-IR was more pronounced in females [e.g., PFOA: –15.6% (95% CI: –25.4, –4.6) vs. –6.1% (95% CI: –16.2, 5.2) for males]. Child PFAS plasma concentrations were not associated with leptin or adiponectin. Prenatal PFAS plasma concentrations were not associated with leptin, adiponectin, or HOMA-IR in offspring. Conclusions: We found no evidence for an adverse effect of early-life PFAS exposure on metabolic function in mid-childhood. In fact, children with higher PFAS concentrations had lower insulin resistance.

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Bibliographic Details
Main Authors: Fleisch, Abby F., Rifas-Shiman, Sheryl L., Mora, Ana Maria, Calafat, Antonia M., Ye, Xiaoyun, Gibson, Heike, Gillman, Matthew W., Oken, Emily, Sagiv, Sharon
Format: http://purl.org/coar/resource_type/c_6501 biblioteca
Language:eng
Published: Environmental Health Perspectives 2017-03-01
Subjects:INFANCIA, CHILDHOOD, SUSTANCIAS PELIGROSAS, DANGEROUS SUBSTANCES, METABOLISMO, METABOLISM, PRODUCTOS QUÍMICOS, TOXICOLOGÍA, SALUD, CHEMICAL PRODUCTS, TOXICOLOGY, HEALTH,
Online Access:http://hdl.handle.net/11056/20736
https://doi.org/10.1289/EHP303Cited
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