Seafloor mapping for geohazard assessment: state of the art

During the last two decades, increasing use of full-coverage sonic mapping of the seafloor has made us more aware of the large and different number of seafloor processes and events bearing significant geohazard potential. This awareness combines with the increasing use of the seafloor for infrastructure and with the high density of population and settlement on the coast. Seafloor mapping is the first step in making a census of the geohazard-bearing features present in a given offshore area. It often provides the only tool for a comprehensive, although non-specific, seafloor geohazard assessment over large areas that are scarcely groundtruthed by acoustic prospection and seafloor sampling. However, the characterization of geohazard features on a morphological basis alone is limited, and more detailed investigations are needed to define the character and state of activity of potentially hazardous features. Such investigations include the use of deep-tow or autonomous platforms designed to acquire high-resolution data at depth as well as in situ measurements, both being very expensive activities not applicable over large areas. Thus seafloor mapping is often not only the first and the main but also the only tool for a comprehensive seafloor geohazard assessment. This special issue represents an example of the diversity of approaches to seafloor geohazard assessment and summarizes the present state of this discipline. Both the diverse technologies applied and the specific aims of offshore geohazard assessment brought different communities to deal with the study of seafloor processes and events from remarkably distinct viewpoints. We identified three end members in offshore geohazard assessment: (1) geohazard assessment ‘‘sensu stricto’’, (2) ‘‘engineering’’ geohazard assessment, (3) ‘‘non-specific’’ geohazard assessment. These are being conducted by industry, academia and public agencies in charge of civil protection and land-use planning and management. Understanding the needs and geohazard perception of the different groups is a necessary step for a profitable collaboration in such an interesting and rapidly developing field of marine geology

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Main Authors: Chiocci, Francesco L., Cattaneo, Antonio, Urgeles, Roger
Format: artículo biblioteca
Language:English
Published: Springer 2011-03
Subjects:Geological risks, Multibeam bathymetry, Natural hazards, Seafloor morphology, Submarine landslides,
Online Access:http://hdl.handle.net/10261/45109
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spelling dig-icm-es-10261-451092020-11-26T06:55:12Z Seafloor mapping for geohazard assessment: state of the art Chiocci, Francesco L. Cattaneo, Antonio Urgeles, Roger Geological risks Multibeam bathymetry Natural hazards Seafloor morphology Submarine landslides During the last two decades, increasing use of full-coverage sonic mapping of the seafloor has made us more aware of the large and different number of seafloor processes and events bearing significant geohazard potential. This awareness combines with the increasing use of the seafloor for infrastructure and with the high density of population and settlement on the coast. Seafloor mapping is the first step in making a census of the geohazard-bearing features present in a given offshore area. It often provides the only tool for a comprehensive, although non-specific, seafloor geohazard assessment over large areas that are scarcely groundtruthed by acoustic prospection and seafloor sampling. However, the characterization of geohazard features on a morphological basis alone is limited, and more detailed investigations are needed to define the character and state of activity of potentially hazardous features. Such investigations include the use of deep-tow or autonomous platforms designed to acquire high-resolution data at depth as well as in situ measurements, both being very expensive activities not applicable over large areas. Thus seafloor mapping is often not only the first and the main but also the only tool for a comprehensive seafloor geohazard assessment. This special issue represents an example of the diversity of approaches to seafloor geohazard assessment and summarizes the present state of this discipline. Both the diverse technologies applied and the specific aims of offshore geohazard assessment brought different communities to deal with the study of seafloor processes and events from remarkably distinct viewpoints. We identified three end members in offshore geohazard assessment: (1) geohazard assessment ‘‘sensu stricto’’, (2) ‘‘engineering’’ geohazard assessment, (3) ‘‘non-specific’’ geohazard assessment. These are being conducted by industry, academia and public agencies in charge of civil protection and land-use planning and management. Understanding the needs and geohazard perception of the different groups is a necessary step for a profitable collaboration in such an interesting and rapidly developing field of marine geology This volume was partially supported by the UNESCO and IUGS through project IGCP-511 ‘‘Submarine Mass Movements and Their consequences’’, currently superseded by IGCP project 585, ‘‘Earth’s continental MARgins: aSsessing geoHAzard from submarine Landslides (E-MARSHAL; http://www.igcp585.org) and of MaGIC project ‘‘Marine Geohazards along the Italian Coasts’’ (www.magicproject.it). Finally, National Civil Protection Department of Italy and namely Prof. B. de Bernardinis, are acknowledged not only for the aid they gave to the Ischia conference and to the volume but for supporting the MaGIC Project (Marine Geohazards along the Italian Coasts, www.magicproject.it) that is boosting a new wave of marine geology researches among the Italian marine geology community Peer reviewed 2012-02-03T08:59:26Z 2012-02-03T08:59:26Z 2011-03 artículo http://purl.org/coar/resource_type/c_6501 Marine Geophysical Researches 32(1-2): 1-11 (2011) 0025-3235 http://hdl.handle.net/10261/45109 10.1007/s11001-011-9139-8 1573-0581 en https://doi.org/10.1007/s11001-011-9139-8 open Springer
institution ICM ES
collection DSpace
country España
countrycode ES
component Bibliográfico
access En linea
databasecode dig-icm-es
tag biblioteca
region Europa del Sur
libraryname Biblioteca del ICM España
language English
topic Geological risks
Multibeam bathymetry
Natural hazards
Seafloor morphology
Submarine landslides
Geological risks
Multibeam bathymetry
Natural hazards
Seafloor morphology
Submarine landslides
spellingShingle Geological risks
Multibeam bathymetry
Natural hazards
Seafloor morphology
Submarine landslides
Geological risks
Multibeam bathymetry
Natural hazards
Seafloor morphology
Submarine landslides
Chiocci, Francesco L.
Cattaneo, Antonio
Urgeles, Roger
Seafloor mapping for geohazard assessment: state of the art
description During the last two decades, increasing use of full-coverage sonic mapping of the seafloor has made us more aware of the large and different number of seafloor processes and events bearing significant geohazard potential. This awareness combines with the increasing use of the seafloor for infrastructure and with the high density of population and settlement on the coast. Seafloor mapping is the first step in making a census of the geohazard-bearing features present in a given offshore area. It often provides the only tool for a comprehensive, although non-specific, seafloor geohazard assessment over large areas that are scarcely groundtruthed by acoustic prospection and seafloor sampling. However, the characterization of geohazard features on a morphological basis alone is limited, and more detailed investigations are needed to define the character and state of activity of potentially hazardous features. Such investigations include the use of deep-tow or autonomous platforms designed to acquire high-resolution data at depth as well as in situ measurements, both being very expensive activities not applicable over large areas. Thus seafloor mapping is often not only the first and the main but also the only tool for a comprehensive seafloor geohazard assessment. This special issue represents an example of the diversity of approaches to seafloor geohazard assessment and summarizes the present state of this discipline. Both the diverse technologies applied and the specific aims of offshore geohazard assessment brought different communities to deal with the study of seafloor processes and events from remarkably distinct viewpoints. We identified three end members in offshore geohazard assessment: (1) geohazard assessment ‘‘sensu stricto’’, (2) ‘‘engineering’’ geohazard assessment, (3) ‘‘non-specific’’ geohazard assessment. These are being conducted by industry, academia and public agencies in charge of civil protection and land-use planning and management. Understanding the needs and geohazard perception of the different groups is a necessary step for a profitable collaboration in such an interesting and rapidly developing field of marine geology
format artículo
topic_facet Geological risks
Multibeam bathymetry
Natural hazards
Seafloor morphology
Submarine landslides
author Chiocci, Francesco L.
Cattaneo, Antonio
Urgeles, Roger
author_facet Chiocci, Francesco L.
Cattaneo, Antonio
Urgeles, Roger
author_sort Chiocci, Francesco L.
title Seafloor mapping for geohazard assessment: state of the art
title_short Seafloor mapping for geohazard assessment: state of the art
title_full Seafloor mapping for geohazard assessment: state of the art
title_fullStr Seafloor mapping for geohazard assessment: state of the art
title_full_unstemmed Seafloor mapping for geohazard assessment: state of the art
title_sort seafloor mapping for geohazard assessment: state of the art
publisher Springer
publishDate 2011-03
url http://hdl.handle.net/10261/45109
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