Organización para Estudios Tropicales, (OET), Costa Rica
Bibliografía Nacional en Biología Tropical, (BINABITROP)

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Signatura:Biblioteca OET: S5258.
Autor: Spotila, James R; Dunham, Arthur E; Leslie, Alison J; Steyermark, Anthony C; Plotkin, Pamela T; Paladino, Frank V.
Dirección: Drexel University, School of Environmental Sciences Engineering & Policy, Philadelphia, PA 19104, US E-mail: spotilld@drexel.edu E-mail: paladino@ipfw.edu.
Título: Worldwide population decline of Dermochelys coriacea: are leatherback turtles going extinct?. Reducción mundial de la población de Dermochelys coriaceae: ¨están las tortugas baula en vía de extinción?.
P.imprenta: v. 2, no. 2, p. 209-222. Año 1996.
Serie: Chelonian Conservation and Biology.
Notas: Look for a picture and species profile: Dermochelys coriacea: http://lionfish.ims.usm.edu/~musweb/dermocor.htm Dermochelys coriacea: http://www.orf.org/turtles_leatherback.html Look for more information about: Dermochelys coriacea: http://animaldiversity.ummz.umich.edu/accounts/dermochelys/d._coriacea$narrative.html Dermochelys coriacea: http://www.unep-wcmc.org/species/data/species/sheets/leatherb.htm Dermochelys coriacea: http://www.dec.state.ny.us/website/dfwmr/wildlife/endspec/leatfs.html.
Descriptores: ANIMALS; CHORDATES; VERTEBRATES; REPTILES; TESTUDINATA.
DERMOCHELYIDAE; DERMOCHELYS CORIACEA; TURTLES; POPULATION; CONSERVATION; SPECIES EXTINCTION; DEMOGRAPHIC MODEL; POACHING; HARVEST; MANAGEMENT.
COSTA RICA; CENTRAL AMERICA.
PLAYA NARANJO; PARQUE NACIONAL TORTUGUERO; AREA DE CONSERVACION TORTUGUERO; REFUGIO NACIONAL DE VIDA SILVESTRE GANDOCA-MANZANILLO; AREA DE CONSERVACION LA AMISTAD CARIBE; PARQUE NACIONAL MARINO LAS BAULAS; PLAYA GRANDE; AREA DE CONSERVACION TEMPISQUE.
Resumen: We estimated the number of leatherbacks, Dermochelys coriacea, nesting on 28 beaches throughout the world from the literature and from communications with investigators studying those beaches. The estimated worldwide population of leatherbacks in 1995 was about 34,500 females on these beaches with a lower limit of about 26,200 and an upper limit of about 42,900. This is less than one third the 1980 estimate of 115,000. Leatherbacks are rare in the Indian Ocean and in verylow numbers in the western Pacific Ocean. The largest population is in the western Atlantic. We used an age-based demographic model to answer "what if?" questions about the stability of leatherback populations. We formulated a hypothetical life table model based on estimated ages of sexual maturity at 5 or 15 years. Leatherbacks that mature in 5 years would exhibit much greater population fluctuations in response to external factors than would turtles that mature in 15 years. Simulations indicated that leatherbacks would maintain a stable population only if both juvenile and adult survivorship remained high. If other life stages (egg, hatchling, juvenile) remain static, stable leatherback populations could not withstand and increase in adult mortality above natural background levels without decreasing. However, protection of eggs during incubation and hatchlings during their first day of life (potentially doubling survival) could have a significant effect on overall stability of leatherback populations in the face of an increase in adult mortality. Leatherback populations in the Indian Ocean and western Pacific Ocean cannot withstand even moderate levels of adult mortality. Even the Atlantic populations are being exploited at a rate that cannot be sustained. Leatherbacks are on the road to extinction and further population declines can be expected unless we take action to reduce adult mortality and increase survival of eggs and hatchlings
Compiled by: Organization for Tropical Studies


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